Tag Archives: UUA Common Read

UUA Common Read: Two selections for 2017

Side-by-side cover images for 'Daring Democracy' and 'Centering'

The Unitarian Universalist Association’s Common Read Selection Committee has chosen two books for this year’s program. They are: Centering: Navigating Race, Authenticity, and Power in Ministry, edited by Mitra Rahnema (Skinner House, 2017), and Daring Democracy: Igniting Power, Meaning, and Connection for the America We Want, by Frances Moore Lappé and Adam Eichen, (Beacon Press, September 2017).
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‘Declaration of Conscience’ affirms UU values

Unitarian Universalist Association chalice consisting of stemmed vessel ringed by two interlocking circles

Photo credit: Unitarian Universalist Association

We’re writing with what we expect is the same urgent sense of concern you’re feeling about the results of the presidential election and what will follow. Based on the many conversations we’ve had with each other, people of our communities, our partners, and those most likely to face looming threats, we’ve concluded that in these extraordinary times we must be united in purpose to protect the values of our democracy and those vulnerable populations among us.
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Discussion guide for UUA ‘Common Read’

Book cover: The Third ReconstructionA discussion guide is available for “the Unitarian Universalist Association’s “Common Read,”” is The Third Reconstruction: How a Moral Movement is Overcoming the Politics of Division and Fear by The Rev. Dr. William Barber II and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove.

A paperback edition of the book is now available from the UU Book and Gift Shop, with bulk discounts available.
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UUA announces 2016-2017 ‘Common Read’

Book cover: The Third ReconstructionThe Unitarian Universalist Association has announced the 2016-2017 “Common Read” is The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement, by The Rev. Dr. William Barber II and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove.

The Common Read selection committee believes this is a moment for Unitarian Universalists to answer a call by Rev. Barber during General Assembly 2016, to build and sustain a movement for justice for all people.

“The Third Reconstruction offers helpful, practical guidance for engaging with justice movements born in response to local experiences of larger injustices. Drawing on the prophetic traditions of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, while making room for other sources of truth, the book challenges us to ground our justice work in moral dissent, even when there is no reasonable expectation of political success, and to do the hard work of coalition building in a society that is fractured and polarized.”

A discussion guide for UU congregations, groups and individuals will be available by Oct. 1, with plans for both a single session and three more in-depth sessions.

Discussion of ‘Just Mercy,’ UUA Common Read

Book cover, Just Mercy by Bryan StevensonRVUUF’s Adult Programs will host a presentation and discussion led by Stephen Conclin on this year’s “Common Read,” Just Mercy, A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, at noon Sunday, April 24, in Emerson House next door to RVUUF.

According to a biographical note on the UUA website, Stevenson “has dedicated his legal career to defending those who are trapped by an often capricious, political, and willfully unjust criminal justice system — poor people, people of color, children, and others over whom the system has run roughshod.”

The book’s selection as the UUA’s Common Read “speaks to justice, mercy, and compassion, themes of concern to us as Unitarian Universalists and as human beings. It follows on recent Common Reads, such as The New Jim Crow and Reclaiming Prophetic Witness, and responds to recent statements passed by the delegates to the UUA General Assembly.”

‘Just Mercy,’ UUA Common Read

Book cover, Just Mercy by Bryan StevensonThe Unitarian Universalist Association announced today that this year’s “Common Read” is Just Mercy, A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson.

According to a biographical note on the UUA website, Stevenson “has dedicated his legal career to defending those who are trapped by an often capricious, political, and willfully unjust criminal justice system – poor people, people of color, children, and others over whom the system has run roughshod.”

The book’s selection as this year’s Common Read “speaks to justice, mercy, and compassion, themes of concern to us as Unitarian Universalists and as human beings. It follows on recent Common Reads, such as The New Jim Crow and Reclaiming Prophetic Witness, and responds to recent statements passed by the delegates to the UUA General Assembly.”

A discussion guide will be available by the beginning of October, with plans for one or three sessions of a discussion group. The UUA Bookstore will offer a bulk-purchase discount on five or more books.